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Study: Fewer high school students plan to attend 4-year universities

This photo taken March 12, 2014, shows student Rahman Hassan holding a pencil as he works on an exercise in a remedial English course at Baltimore City Community College in Baltimore. Only about a quarter of students nationally who take developmental _ or remedial _ classes ever graduate. The problem is so profound that the advocacy group Complete College America dubs remedial classes the “bridge to nowhere.” The challenge, educators say, is that even as billions is spent annually on remedial classes, many of these students run out of financial aid before they can complete their credit requirements, get discouraged by non-credit classes or find themselves unable to complete them. The Baltimore school is one of several places around the country looking to improve the odds for these students. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

This photo taken March 12, 2014, shows student Rahman Hassan holding a pencil as he works on an exercise in a remedial English course at Baltimore City Community College in Baltimore. Only about a quarter of students nationally who take developmental _ or remedial _ classes ever graduate. The problem is so profound that the advocacy group Complete College America dubs remedial classes the “bridge to nowhere.” The challenge, educators say, is that even as billions is spent annually on remedial classes, many of these students run out of financial aid before they can complete their credit requirements, get discouraged by non-credit classes or find themselves unable to complete them. The Baltimore school is one of several places around the country looking to improve the odds for these students. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

File- A student holds a pencil as he works on an exercise in a remedial English course at Baltimore City Community College in Baltimore, Md. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 7:34 AM PT – Monday, March 15, 2021

A new survey found fewer high school students plan on going to college. A recent study by ECMC Group, a non-profit aimed at helping student borrowers, said the likelihood of students attending a four-year school dropped 20 percent in the last eight months.

This comes as the average cost of a private university in 2020 was more than $50,000 a year and public universities averaged more then $20,000 a year. With less income from on-campus students, some universities are increasing tuition to make up for it.

“Our housing and dining has taken a big hit financially in terms of revenue, probably $130 million revenue decrease compared to a normal academic year,” said Cynthia Larive, chancellor at the University of California Santa Cruz.

The report also found high school students found more value in career training and post-grad employment.

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