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Mich. GOP seeks to bypass Democrat Gov. Whitmer veto with election integrity package

Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer introduces Democratic Presidential Candidate Joe Biden to speak at Beech Woods Recreation Center in Southfield, Michigan, on October 16, 2020. - Joe Biden on October 16, 2020 described President Donald Trump's reluctance to denounce white supremacists as "stunning" in a hard-hitting speech in battleground Michigan with 18 days to go until the election. (Photo by JIM WATSON / AFP) (Photo by JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images)

Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer introduces Democratic Presidential Candidate Joe Biden to speak at Beech Woods Recreation Center in Southfield, Michigan, on October 16, 2020. - Joe Biden on October 16, 2020 described President Donald Trump's reluctance to denounce white supremacists as "stunning" in a hard-hitting speech in battleground Michigan with 18 days to go until the election. (Photo by JIM WATSON / AFP) (Photo by JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images)

Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer is shown at Beech Woods Recreation Center in Southfield, Michigan, on October 16, 2020. (Photo by JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 2:20 PM PT – Saturday, March 27, 2021

Michigan’s Republican-controlled legislature announced plans to enable new voter laws that would bypass a likely veto from Democrat Gov. Gretchen Whitmer.

State Republican Party Chair Ron Weiser announced the proposal this week, saying the party is supporting the election integrity bills.

This August, 2020 photo, shows Ron Weiser, left, chairman of the Michigan Republican Party, and Ronna Romney McDaniel, National Republican Committee chairwoman. Michigan Republicans, once the national model for the party's mainstream, have lurched sharply rightward in the past decade. (David Guralnick/Detroit News via AP)

This August, 2020 photo shows Ron Weiser, left, chairman of the Michigan Republican Party, and Ronna Romney McDaniel, National Republican Committee chairwoman. (David Guralnick/Detroit News via AP)

 

“If that legislation is not passed by our legislature, which I am sure it will be, but if it’s not signed by the governor, then we have other plans to make sure that it becomes law before 2022,” Weiser stated.

Among the changes would be a photo ID requirement, restricting absentee ballot drop box hours and a ban on prepaid postage on return envelopes. County GOP parties would need to gather 340,000 voter signatures in order to certify the measure.

The Senate’s Republican majority leader noted the bills will make it easier to vote and harder to cheat.

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