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Attorneys: Russia’s Navalny develops health problems in prison

TOPSHOT - Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny speaks during an interview with AFP at the office of his Anti-corruption Foundation (FBK) in Moscow on January 16, 2018. - The Kremlin's top critic Alexei Navalny has slammed Russia's March presidential election, in which he is barred from running, as a sham meant to "re-appoint" Vladimir Putin on his way to becoming "emperor for life". (Photo by Mladen ANTONOV / AFP) (Photo by MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP via Getty Images)

TOPSHOT - Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny speaks during an interview with AFP at the office of his Anti-corruption Foundation (FBK) in Moscow on January 16, 2018. - The Kremlin's top critic Alexei Navalny has slammed Russia's March presidential election, in which he is barred from running, as a sham meant to "re-appoint" Vladimir Putin on his way to becoming "emperor for life". (Photo by Mladen ANTONOV / AFP) (Photo by MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP via Getty Images)

TOPSHOT – Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny spoke during an interview with AFP at the office of his Anti-corruption Foundation (FBK) in Moscow on January 16, 2018. (Photo by MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP via Getty Images)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 4:10 PM PT – Thursday, March 25, 2021

Attorneys for Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny are sounding the alarm over his worsening health while in prison.

In a statement on Thursday, Navalny’s lawyers said the opposition leader is experiencing strong pain in his spine and right leg. They added Navalny’s issues developed due to the harsh conditions of his imprisonment, which include sleep deprivation and exposure to cold temperatures.

The Russian opposition are demanding an unconditional release of Navalny for medial reasons.

Russian jailed opposition leader Alexei Navalny attends a court hearing in Moscow on June 16, 2017. - Navalny has been sentenced to 30 days behind bars after being detained on June 12 on his way to a protest in Moscow against government corruption, where hundreds were arrested in the city centre. (Photo by Andrey BORODULIN / AFP) (Photo by ANDREY BORODULIN/AFP via Getty Images)

Russian jailed opposition leader Alexei Navalny attended a court hearing in Moscow on June 16, 2017. (Photo by ANDREY BORODULIN/AFP via Getty Images)

 

The Kremlin claimed Navalny’s condition is “stable,” but the opposition said that is a lie.

“Navalny has been suffering for four weeks from this pain. He forbids us to say anything. We knew the day before that his problems with his leg deteriorated,” Olga Mikhailova, attorney for Navalny said. “Only yesterday, when we were not allowed inside the prison, we decided to make it public because we were concerned about his life and health.”

Political experts said the Kremlin may be seeking a compromise solution by releasing Navalny, in exchange for downscaled opposition activities in Russia.

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